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Posts Tagged ‘art’

I think I know what Victor Nunes, a retired art director from São Paulo, Brazil, has for breakfast.

A banana, steamy cappuccino, maybe some bread and butter. But this young-at-heart visionary doesn’t just eat his breakfast, he regularly plays with his food to create delightful doodles and mini pieces of art.

Victor is a person who sees faces in everything. A vivid imagination and a finely honed sense of play seem to be his constant companions each and every day, as he sculpts lighthearted portraits and sketches whimsical scenes. Besides bits of food, he includes everyday objects (pencil shavings, thumbtacks, matchsticks, corks, Q-tips), elevating them from the seemingly mundane to redefine their roles, always inspiring us to take a good second look at whatever is within our reach.

Enjoy this sampler platter of Victor’s work. You will never look at a piece of lettuce, a potato chip or cracker quite the same way again. Enjoy!

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amy

Raleigh, NC artist Amy Flynn is passionate about shopping and making things.

Fantastic, funky, fine, futuristic, flamboyant, fetching, fierce, fanciful, quirky and wonky.

Amy Flynn’s amazing FOBOTS (Found Object Robots) are just plain fun! She scours the world for cool junk to create her one-of-a-kind sculptures, fascinating characters who go by such whimsical, punny names as “Biscotty,” “Boobarella,” “Dan Sedan,” “Robot Robama,” and “Scubi Dude.”

A freelance illustrator for 25+ years (greeting cards, children’s books, giftware), Amy shifted her focus to fobots when the economy tanked in 2008. She admits to always having a weird fixation for robots and loving flea markets, so why not exercise her creative muscle by doing something that truly makes her happy?

family

“Family Out for a Stroll”

She lives in a 1920’s house and her first fobot was made from an original doorknob as well as other junk she found in her basement. Now, in addition to flea markets and scrapyards, Amy finds spare parts via internet auctions. She solders and bolts the pieces together and includes a numbered copper plate on the back of each sculpture. If the fobot opens, there’s a metal heart inside, just like the tin man.

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Crocheted food? Why not? Brighton based knitting genius Kate Jenkins is famous for it.

And no wonder — what a delectable feast she creates with wool and yarn, served with a good side of cheekiness.

Some of these pieces are from Kate’s New York shows. “Kate’s Diner” featured iconic food and drink items associated with NY eateries, and “Kate’s Café” was a full-blown café gallery with many British favorites. Also thought I’d whet your appetite with a few of her “fishy” creations.

Indulge in these calorie-free treats to your heart’s delight. Yum!

chickennoodlesoup

Chicken Noodle Soup

donuts

 

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“The Chosen One”

Today’s spot of creativiTEA is brought to you by Swedish paper artist Cecelia Levy, who creates stunning three dimensional pieces with old book pages and glue, using a papier maché technique. Of her work, she says:

The choice of material is no coincidence. As a graphic designer and bookbinder, I have a strong interest in paper, typography, small details. Text and symbols are sometimes used as decoration, deliberately or randomly. The tactile experience is determined by the quality of the paper. I cherish the traces of the previous owners; dedications, notes, stains, and also the signs of time passing – discolorations, scratches, rust stains and holes after binding.

In my work I explore concepts such as time, memory, transience, traces, resistance and adaptability. Recycling and environmental aspects are important factors, but not the main purpose of my creations.

Isn’t it wonderful how she’s illuminating the personal histories of these old books by assigning them a new form? I like to think of her delicate and seemingly fragile paper cups and saucers as vessels for dreams.

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“Surely a pretty woman never looks prettier than when making tea.” ~ Mary Elizabeth Braden (Lady Audley’s Secret)

“Tea” (George Dunlop Leslie, 1894)

I’ve been having fun looking at late 19th and early 20th century paintings depicting people drinking or serving tea. Most of the subjects are beautifully decked-out, in-the-garden or fancy-sitting-room women who seem to have all the time in the world.

I love imagining their intimate conversations — secrets shared, pride in their children, juicy gossip. I also like the women taking tea alone in quiet contemplation, and covet the lovely tea sets and table settings.

“The Tea Set” (Claude Monet, 1872)

I had to look harder for male subjects, since when it comes to tea drinking in fine art, women reign supreme. What would the great artists of the world do without us to sit for them? It’s not easy lounging about and looking gorgeous all the time. :)

Hope you enjoy these different settings, social and cultural contexts, and thinking about how the ritual of sharing tea fosters a special brand of intimacy. It’s always fascinating to try to read different personalities via facial expressions and posturing. Since there are so many good tea paintings out there, it was hard to pick just 40. Each of these tells a wonderful story.

“At the Tea Table” (Konstantin Korovin, 1888)

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