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wildair

via The Wheatfield

Ah, summer! Time to step away from the stove and laptop, relax, and stay cool.

Mr. Cornelius, 50-something Paddingtons, and I are looking forward to ice cream sundaes, fresh peach pie, reading trashy novels mind-enriching classics, growing basil, hanging out with relatives, tickling the ivories, and shopping for cool things.

Before we sign off for a bit, wanted to share this interesting video of former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins interviewing Sir Paul McCartney at Rollins College last October. They discuss early academic influences (Chaucer, Shakespeare, Keats), songwriting, poetry, celebrity, and much more. Paul shares a few naughty bits from Chaucer’s “Miller’s Tale” and sings “Blackbird” at the end.

photo by Scott Cook

I especially enjoyed hearing how the Beatles honed their craft, how John’s snarkiness complemented Paul’s optimism when it came to writing songs. Paul hasn’t lost any of his boyish charm or good looks, remains humble and grounded, and it was nice to know that had he not become a musician, he might have tried his hand at teaching English. :)

Can you imagine walking into class on the first day of school and seeing Paul as your teacher??!!! SCREAM.

The video is about an hour long, so you might want to bookmark this post and come back later when you have enough time to get nice and comfy, sip a tall glass of iced tea, and enjoy the meeting of two brilliant minds. The students in the video remain amazingly calm throughout. If I ever found myself in the same room with both Billy and Paul, I’d probably faint dead away. Just sayin’.

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Three big Keanu sips, specially requested by Ginger Park.

☕☕☕

“Money doesn’t mean anything to me. I’ve made a lot of money, but I want to enjoy life and not stress myself building my bank account. I give lots away and live simply, mostly out of a suitcase in hotels. We all know that good health is much more important.”

“It’s always wonderful to get to know women, with the mystery and the joy and the depth. If you can make a woman laugh, you’re seeing the most beautiful thing on God’s Earth.”

“I am not handsome or sexy. Of course, it’s not like I’m hopeless.”

 

Who knew he liked cupcakes? Love the CHOCOLATE one in the second photo.

BONUS SIP just cause it’s summer ☕:

Thanks for requesting me, Ginger. See you soon?

 

SIGH. Now I’ll never cool off.

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1. Loving the bright and colorful screen printed greeting cards and paper goods by The Seapink, a NewYork-based design studio owned by Boyoun Kim and Sue Jean Ko. These talented gals originally met several years ago in printmaking class at the School of Visual Arts and bonded over their mutual love for silkscreen printing. Their cards and prints exude a cheerful childlike innocence and are just the thing to brighten up any occasion.

Of course I especially love their food and tea time designs, but their animals and flowers are equally happy-making. Check out their website and Etsy Shop for more. :)

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2. Tolkien fans will enjoy this scenic tour of Hobbiton recently featured at Literary Vittles. You probably know the Lord of the Rings films were shot in New Zealand. Thanks to blogger Alina and photographer Greg, we can all enjoy a peek of The Shire movie set with notable quotes from the books! What a gorgeous, magical place — you kind of expect Bilbo Baggins, Mr. Frodo or Sam to pop out at any moment. Best thing about hobbits? Hairy feet and big appetites. :)

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3. From Epicurious, “57 Things You Can Do to Be a Better Cook Right Now.” Lots of great tips here and it was fun to see which things on the list I’m already doing. The suggestions range from the very simple “Buy a new kitchen sponge,” to the interesting “Buy your avocados at a Mexican grocery store,” to the sensible “Bake your pies in glass pans,” to the slightly eyebrow-raising “Get your knives professionally sharpened.” Cause there’s always room for improvement, right?

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1. “After the Holidays,” and “Dianthus” by Barbara Crooker

2. “Produce Aisle” by Rebecca McClanahan

3. “The Cookie Poem” by Jeff Gundy

4. “Paddington Bear — poem about myself as a child” by Tracey Cooper

5. PRESIDENTIAL MISADVENTURES by Bob Raczka and Dan E. Burr

6. A Little Downton Abbey Valentine

7. NEVER TAKE A PIG TO LUNCH by Nadine Bernard Westcott

8. SALSA: A COOKING POEM by Jorge Argueta and Duncan Tonatiuh

9. “Home Sweet Home” by Kate Bingham

10. COUNTING CROWS by Kathi Appelt and Rob Dunlavey

11. “Poem from a Colour Chart of Housepaints” by Wendy Cope

12. “Eating Poetry” by Mark Strand

13. “Remember” by Christina Rossetti

14. Three Poems from The Popcorn Astronauts by Deborah Ruddell

15. A POEM IN YOUR POCKET by Margaret McNamara and G. Brian Karas

16. ENORMOUS SMALLNESS: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess and Kris Di Giacomo

17. DEAR TOMATO: An International Crop of Food and Agriculture Poems, edited by Carol-Ann Hoyte

18. 10 Food Poetry Anthologies for Hungry Readers

19. COOL MELONS – TURN TO FROGS! by Matthew Gollub and Kazuko G. Stone

20. Bob Dylan Birthday Celebration with Josh White’s “One Meat Ball”

21. “Ode to Tortillas” by Fernando Esteban Flores

22. “Brownies” by Judyth Hill

23. “Here There are Blueberries” by Mary Syzbist (+ Poetry Friday Roundup)

24. “The International Fruit of Welcome” by Kim Roberts, and “Great-Grandfather” by Charlotte Mandel

25. Interview at Rollins College with Billy Collins and Paul McCartney

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*A permanent link to this archive can be found in the sidebar of this blog.

“The joys of the table belong equally to all ages, conditions, countries and times; they mix with all other pleasures, and remain the last to console us for their loss.” (Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin)

Talk about a kid in a candy store. As soon as my copy of Joys of the Table arrived, I polished my silver soup spoon, donned my nattiest bib (velvet trim, don’t you know), licked my chops, then ever so intently sipped, munched, chewed, relished and savored each and every poem in this tasty tome.

What a marvelous feast! The 100 or so poems (some with recipes) by 75 poets from around the country are served up in six courses: Amuse Bouche, What We Eat, Food and Love, Geography of Food, Kitchen Memories, and Food and Mortality. It was nice to see quite a few familiar favorites (Diane Lockward, Sharon Auberle, Barbara Crooker, Andrea Potos, Jacqueline Jules, Susan Rich, Annelies Zijderveld), as well as discover many new-to-me poets whose delicious verses left me craving more of their work (Lisa Kosow, Eric Forsbergh, Katharyn Howd Machan, Dianne Silvestri, Anne Meek, and Christie Grimes to name a few).

“Interior with Phonograph” by Henri Matisse (1924)

In a publisher’s interview, Editor Sally Zakariya was asked why she decided to put together an anthology of food poems:

I wondered that myself more than once! But really, food in its many aspects—personal, sentimental, sensual, universal—is a natural subject for poetry. I realized I had written a number of poems about remembered meals, nurturing cooks, and food as a symbol of communion and contentment, and I found that other poets I know had, too. And because food is so basic to our relationships with family and friends and lovers, I thought many poets would like to have such an anthology on their own shelves—and perhaps to give copies to their favorite cooks.

There certainly was no shortage of submissions — Sally received hundreds of additional poems worthy of being included — but ultimately her criteria for selection was subjective. I do like her taste in poems, noting that there was a higher percentage of poems that resonated with me in this anthology than in others.  Continue Reading »

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