nine cool things on a tuesday

Copyright © 2017 Mary Engelbreit

 

1. Been a Mary Engelbreit fan for decades, especially enjoying her greeting cards and calendars. Happy to see her social justice pieces in recent years — like this lovely “Humanity” fine print. It’s available in two sizes, 11″ x 14″ and 16″ x 20″ (signed or unsigned). This design is also available on a t-shirt (50% of proceeds to benefit the ACLU). Nice Valentine’s Day gift, but the sentiment is a good one year round. Check out her online shop for lots more – – books, bags, apparel, games, puzzles, mugs. I am especially loving this Sweet Sipping Cocoa Box. 🙂

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2. New Book Alert! Just released January 8: The Piñata That the Farm Maiden Hung by Samantha R. Vamos and Sebastià Serra (Charlesbridge, 2019):

This is the bilingual story of the farm maiden and her cadre of animals, who crafted a festive piñata for a surprise birthday party. A beautiful and lively companion to the award-winning The Cazuela That the Farm Maiden Stirred (2011).

A young girl sets out on errands for the day, and while she’s gone, the farm maiden prepares a piñata from scratch with help from a boy, horse, goose, cat, sheep, and farmer. After they all fall asleep in the afternoon sun, they must scramble to finish preparations in time–just as the girl arrives back to her surprise party. Key English words change to Spanish as the cumulative verse builds to the celebratory ending. With the familiarity of “The House That Jack Built,” the tale cleverly incorporates Spanish words, adding a new one in place of the English word from the previous page. This book makes learning the language easy and fun. Back matter includes a glossary, definitions, and directions for making a piñata at home.

Sounds good, no? It’s already earned a *starred review* from Foreword Reviews. Check out this recent audio interview with Samantha at the publisher’s site.

Congratulations to Samantha and Sebastià!

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joy soup for a new blue year

“I’m a ‘blue sky thinker’ and dream big.” ~ Hilary Knight

Hello Cutie Pies, and Hello Brand New Year!!

Yes, we’re back. Actually, we’re back and BLUE. Once again.

It feels good to open a new calendar and be a member of the Clean Slate Club. As Anne Shirley said, “Tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet.” Oh, the possibilities!

Come what may, COOKIES are always a good idea — along with warm cups of tea, a comfy chair, and a good book or two or five hundred. 🙂

We’re all bears here (oh, you’ve noticed?). Hibernate is the name of the game. 🐻

So, did you have a good holiday? One of the nicest things to happen here was welcoming a new resident, BLUE BEAR.

He arrived on our doorstep thanks to the kindness and generosity of dear blogger friend Linda Baie, who hangs out at TeacherDance. Not too long ago, I stumbled across a photo of Big Blue Bear online; those of you who are from or have visited Denver are probably familiar with him, as he’s been peeking into the Colorado Convention Center since 2005.

But until a couple of months ago, I did not know he existed! Yes, I lead a sheltered life, but one would THINK that since Len travels to Denver sometimes on business, he would have mentioned Big Blue Bear at some point. He’s lived with over 300 bears for 30-odd years and knows very well I would want to know about this cool 40-ft high, 10,000 pound sculpture. Men!

 

“I See What You Mean”/Big Blue Bear was created by the late Lawrence Argent, an art professor at the University of Denver.

 

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2018 Poetry Friday Archive

l. “His Favorite Blue Cup” by Stephen Dobyns

2. BLUE CORN SOUP by Caroline Stutson and Teri Weidner

3. CAN I TOUCH YOUR HAIR?: Poems of Race, Mistakes and Friendship by Irene Latham and Charles Waters

4. “The Forgotten Dialect of the Heart” by Jack Gilbert

5. “Good Taste” by Michelle Holland

6. “Yaya’s Sweets” by Andrea Potos

7. LIBBA: The Magnificent Musical Life of Elizabeth Cotten by Laura Veirs and Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

8. “A Few Things I Ate” by Faith Shearin

9. WHEN PAUL MET ARTIE: The Story of Simon and Garfunkel by G. Neri and David Litchfield

10. WITH MY HANDS: Poems About Making Things by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, Lou Fancher and Steve Johnson

11. Poetry Chat with Andrea Potos about Arrows of Light

12. WORLD MAKE WAY: New Poems Inspired by Art from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins

13. “when faces called flowers float out of the ground,” by E. E. Cummings

14. H IS FOR HAIKU: A Treasury of Haiku from A to Z, by Sydell Rosenberg and Sawsan Chalabi

15. Five “blue” haiku by Issa

16. “The Bluebird” by Emily Dickinson + “What Gorgeous Thing” by Mary Oliver + Poetry Friday Roundup

17. FOOD TRUCK FEST! by Alexandra Penfold and Mike Dutton

18. Bob Dylan Birthday Blues

19. A IS FOR ASTRONAUT:  Blasting Through the Alphabet by Clayton Anderson and Scott Brundage

20. WRITE ON, IRVING BERLIN! by Leslie Kimmelman and David C. Gardner

21. “Relax” by Ellen Bass

22. “Summer Song” by William Carlos Williams, “The House Was Quiet and the World Was Calm,” By Wallace Stevens, and “Summer Stars” by Carl Sandburg

23. “Dream Teaching” by Edwin Romond

24. DREAMING OF YOU by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater and Aaron DeWitt

25. “Short-Order Cook” by Jim Daniels

26. BOOKJOY, WORDJOY by Pat Mora and Raul Colón

27. “The Tablecloth” by Gail Fishman Gerwin

28. MONSTER SCHOOL by Kate Coombs and Lee Gatlin

29. “From My Mother’s Kitchen: An Alphabet Poem,” by Pat Brisson

30. “Small Town Cashews” by Alberto Rios

31. “My Mother Goes to Vote” + Poetry Friday Roundup

32. “November” by Maggie Dietz

33. “Perfect for Any Occasion” by Alberto Rios

34. A MOVIE IN MY PILLOW/Una pelicula en mi almohada by Jorge Argueta and Elizabeth Gomez

35. CARLOS SANTANA: Sound of the Heart, Song of the World by Gary Golio and Rudy Gutierrez

36. “A Christmas Alphabet” by Carolyn Wells


*A link to this archive can be found in the sidebar of this blog

ABCs of Christmas, a yummy recipe, and a holiday blog break

#58 in an ongoing series of posts celebrating the alphabet

Please help yourself to some of Susan Branch’s Christmas Coffee Cake 🙂

 

Ho Ho Ho!

To celebrate the season, here’s an old fashioned Christmas abecedarian by American poet Carolyn Wells. This verse was first published as a picture book by McLoughlin Brothers in 1900, and describes how many of us still define Christmas more than a century later.

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A CHRISTMAS ALPHABET
by Carolyn Wells

A is for Angel who graces the tree.
B is for Bells that chime out in glee.
C is for Candle to light Christmas Eve.
D is for Dreams which we truly believe.
E is for Evergreens cut for the room.
F is for Flowers of exquisite perfume.
G is for Gifts that bring us delight.
H is for Holly with red berries bright.
I is for Ice, so shining and clear.
J is the Jingle of bells far and near.
K is Kriss Kringle with fur cap and coat.
L is for Letters the children all wrote.
M is for Mother, who’s trimming the bough.
N is for Night, see the stars sparkling now.
O is for Ornaments, dazzling with light.
P for Plum Pudding that tasted just right.
Q the Quadrille, in which each one must dance.
R is for Reindeer that gallop and prance.
S is for Snow that falls silently down.
T is for Turkey, so tender and brown.
U is for Uproar that goes on all day.
V is for Voices that carol a lay.
W is for Wreaths hung up on the wall.
X is for Xmas, with pleasures for all.
Y is for Yule log that burns clear and bright.
Z is for Zest shown from morning till night.

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[review + recipe] A Grandfather’s Lessons: In the Kitchen with Shorey by Jacques Pépin

“It is important to have a child spend time in the kitchen — the most secure, comfortable, loving place in the house. The smell of food cooking, your mother’s or father’s voice, the clang of the utensils, and the taste of the food: These memories will stay with you for the rest of your life.” ~ Jacques Pépin

Jacques Pépin once asked his then two-year-old granddaughter Shorey Wesen whether she liked blueberries. She said she loved them, adding that they contained antioxidants. This early precociousness regarding food wasn’t especially surprising, since both her father and grandfather are professional chefs, and her mother Claudine cooks for the family every day, using fresh ingredients either from their home garden or nearby organic markets.

From about the age of five, whenever Shorey visited her grandparents, she’d stand on a wooden box next to Jacques so she could “help” him cook. Simple tasks like washing the lettuce, helping to gather herbs from the garden, or passing tools or ingredients, made Shorey comfortable in the kitchen and more enthusiastic about eating the food she helped prepare.

 

 

For both Shorey and her mom, there was no such thing as “kid’s food.” They learned to eat what the grown-ups were eating, subsequently developing a gourmand’s palate. This, along with Jacques’s longstanding philosophy that “great meals are always the ones that are shared with family and friends,” form the basis for A Grandfather’s Lessons: In the Kitchen with Shorey (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017).

 

Deviled Eggs with Salmon Caviar

 

Just as he taught Claudine how to cook in one of his PBS cooking series, Jacques shares cooking basics with 13-year-old Shorey in this accessible collection of 75 recipes, 36 of which have companion 10-minute videos hosted at Sur La Table.

This is less a “children’s” cookbook than a primer for novice cooks of any age, with simple and elegant recipes presented via clear, step-by-step instructions, beautiful color photographs, Jacques’s winsome line art, engaging headnotes full of tips and family stories, and occasional quotes from Shorey. Recipes were chosen in line with Shorey’s favorites and what she would have the most fun making.

 

Shorey’s Raspberry Cake

 

The book opens with lessons on setting the table and good table manners, followed by sections featuring Hors d’Oeuvres, Soups and Salads; Eggs, Sandwiches, Pizza, and Breads; Fish and Shellfish; Poultry and Meat; Pasta and Quinoa; Vegetables; Desserts and Confections; and Decorating for Fun.

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