cookie capers, reindeer poems, and a holiday blog break

Backward, turn backward, O Time in your flight;
Make me a child again just for tonight.”
~ Elizabeth Akers Allen

Ramona Quimby dropped by!

‘Tis the season for cookies, cookies, cookies, those crispy chewy crumbly tokens of love, sweet love ❤️.

If pies are the best part of Thanksgiving, then cookies are definitely the best part of Christmas. We all have our favorites — cookies we make for gifts, parties, exchanges, or just for ourselves (because we deserve it, right?). What will be on your cookie platter this year?

from Baby’s Christmas by Eloise Wilkin (1980)

Hmmmm, let me guess — sugar cookies cut in the shapes of stars, bells, or candy canes? Or maybe Chocolate Crinkles, Snickerdoodles, Mexican Wedding Cakes, rich Butter Cookies or old fashioned Gingerbread? Oh, I know! Molasses Spice! Spritz! Raspberry Thumbprints! Pecan Shortbread, Peanut Butter Blossoms, Classic Chocolate Chip? Maybe you’re into Stained Glass Cookies, Coconut Macaroons, or (you saucy minx) Rum Balls! Oh ho! 🙂

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2016 Poetry Friday Archive

1. “Be Kind” by Michael Blumenthal

2. “Soup” by John McCutcheon

3. TOO MANY TOMATOES by Eric Ode and Kent Culotta

4. “To Blueberries” by Adele Kenny

5. “Cherry Cordial” by Gary Hanna, “Ghazal of Chocolate” by Ed Zahniser, “Chocolate” by Rita Dove

6. FRESH DELICIOUS: Poems from the Farmers’ Market by Irene Latham and Mique Moriuchi

7. MY VILLAGE: Rhymes from Around the World by Danielle Wright and Mique Moriuchi

8. ALPHA BETA CHOWDER by Jeanne Steig and William Steig

9. MORE THAN ENOUGH by April Halprin Wayland and Katie Kath

10. Beatrix Potter nursery rhymes: Appley Dapply and Cecily Parsley

11. Four Poems from WHEN GREEN BECOMES TOMATOES by Julie Fogliano and Julie Morstad

12. “On How to Pick and Eat Poems” by Phyllis Cole-Dai

13. WILL’S WORDS by Jane Sutcliffe and John Shelley

14. THE LAST FIFTH GRADE OF EMERSON ELEMENTARY by Laura Shovan

15. A MOOSE BOOSH: A Few Choice Words About Food by Eric-Shabazz Larkin

16. “My Mother’s Kitchen” by Hope Anita Smith

17. OCTOPUS’S GARDEN by Ringo Starr and Ben Cort

18. Breakfast Poetry Buffet: “A Litany of Toast” by Cathy Lentes, “Breakfast” by Merrill Leffler, “The Life of Man” by Russell Edson, “Rendering” by Seth Bockley, “Imaginary Conversation” by Linda Pastan.

19. WHAT ARE YOU GLAD ABOUT? WHAT ARE YOU MAD ABOUT? by Judith Viorst and Lee White

20. “For the Chocolate Tasters” by Diane Lockward

21. Paul McCartney’s 74th Birthday Celebration

22. THE HORRIBLY HUNGRY GINGERBREAD BOY: A San Francisco Story by Elisa Kleven

23. “The Self-Playing Instrument of Water” by Alice Oswald

24. SOMOS COMO LAS NUBES/WE ARE LIKE THE CLOUDS by Jorge Argueta and Alfonso Ruano

25. “Ode to Chocolate” by Lesléa Newman

26. MISS MUFFET, OR WHAT CAME AFTER by Marilyn Singer and David Litchfield

27. On Bob Dylan winning the Nobel Prize in Literature

28. NO FAIR! NO FAIR! by Calvin Trillin and Roz Chast

29. ARE YOU AN ECHO? THE LOST POEMS OF MISUZU KANEKO by David Jacobson, Sally Ito, Michiko Tsuboi, and Toshikado Hajiri

30. “Poetry is the Art of Not Succeeding” by Joe Salerno + Roundup

31. “I’m Still Standing” by Janis Ian + James’ 102nd Birthday

32. “Eggs Satori” by Karen Greenbaum-Maya

33. “Ode to Spoons” by Joan Logghe

34. “Eating a Herd of Reindeer” by Kevin Pilkington, “Reindeer Report” by U.A. Fanthorpe

*A link to this archive can be found in the sidebar of this blog.

friday feast: joan logghe’s “Ode to Spoons” (+ a recipe)

from “Back to the Land” by Maira Kalman (2009)

When it comes to eating utensils, spoons reign supreme.

I’ve always loved them more than knives or forks, with their aggressive blades and tines, slices and stabs.

Spoons are friendlier, nurturing. Their rounded bowls invite you to dip, sip, and slurp. The word “spoon,” with its fun-to-pronounce double ‘o,’ has a charm all its own. Say it now:

SPOON

See how your lips gently touch like a soft kiss? Adorable. 🙂

For most of us, spoons came first. Our hungry baby mouths opened wide for rice cereal, puréed peaches and strained peas. And when some of the food missed its target, the edge of the spoon magically corraled any oozy bits from chin and cheek. So accommodating!

And what about Spoon’s most important function?

SOUP! Ah, soup . . .

I was delighted to discover Joan Logghe’s “Ode to Spoons” recently. Love how she celebrates the divine in the everyday. I was happy to learn she shares my love for Maira Kalman, for whom ordinary objects also take on extraordinary significance when viewed through the lens of history, heart, memory.

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friday feast: “eggs satori” by karen greenbaum-maya

“Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the world earth revolves – slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future; live the actual moment. Only this moment is life.” ~Thich Nhat Hanh

“Breakfast Piece” by Herbert Badham (1936)

During these trying times, each of us finds a way to cope. The response I’m hearing most often from my author and illustrator friends is, “Make Something Beautiful.”

The simple act of creating something new is not only life affirming — it affords the creator the calm that comes with total immersion in a project. Writers often talk about “being in flow,” when you lose all sense of time and place, and the only thing that matters is the work.

I liken “being in flow” with mindfulness. When we are fully present there is no worry over future events or regret about the past.

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a birthday song for my dad

James: fisherman, harmonica champion, Facebook fanatic, lemon meringue pie eater.

Not too long ago, when my father was a young whippersnapper in his late 80’s, we gave him an internet subscription for his birthday.

He was already on the computer playing video games, but had yet to venture onto the world wide web. He started out with a dial-up connection, quickly learned the ins and outs of sending emails, and before we knew it he was happily visiting news sites, participating in a chat forum, and placing dollar wagers on his favorite lottery sites.

Today, James turns 102. Willful and wireless, he’s burned through at least 3 desktops since his first foray online.

Every day he logs onto Facebook and shares clusters of updates with his friends. Ever the fastidious organizer, he opts for a recurring series of themed posts rather than mundane status reports: tree houses, bonsai plants, interesting facts, old Hawai’i, music fix of the day, joke of the day, and of course, FOOD. On Sundays he shares a hymn and a prayer.

Dad and me at Haleiwa Beach Park.

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